#024 Today In Technology History by:Amy Elk

08/19/10 “Linus Pauling and Pascal”TiTH.TechJives.net by:Amy Elk
Keywords: amy elk podcast tech jives techjives techjives.net chris pope today in technology history amyelk.com voice actress
Feedburner RSS feed:
http://feeds.feedburner.com/tith

This Day in Tech: Aug. 19, 1839: Photography Goes Open Source

1839: With a French pension in hand, Louis Daguerre reveals the secrets of making daguerreotypes to a waiting world. The pioneering photographic process is an instant hit.

Using chemical reactions to make images with light was not quite new. Doing it fast was. Inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niepce created a rough image using silver salts and a camera obscura, or “dark box,” in 1816. The image faded away quickly.

Another decade of work led to the first permanent photographic image, when Niepce fixed a shot of his courtyard onto a pewter plate. The exposure took eight hours in bright sunlight. Niepce continued researching in hopes of making the process faster and more practical.

Daguerre was a successful commercial artist hoping to increase the realism of his giant diorama paintings, some of them 70 feet long by 45 feet high. When using a camera obscura to sketch the outlines (or cartoons) for his paintings, he thought it would be better to create images directly with the camera. He began experimenting.

Daguerre’s optician told him about Niepce’s work. Daguerre and Niepce began a correspondence that turned into a partnership in 1829. Niepce died in 1833, and his son Isidore labored on. But it was Daguerre’s advances with silver-plated copper sheets, iodine and mercury that cut exposure time down to minutes and created positive rather than negative images.

Daguerre was unable to sell his process by subscription, but it caught the interest of François Arago, perpetual secretary of the French Academy of Sciences. It was under the auspices of the academy that Daguerre first displayed his daguerreotypes to the public on Jan. 9, 1839. They created a sensation.

For the rest of this story, and more This Day in Tech, visit Wired.com

The 10 best IT certifications: 2010

  • Date: August 17th, 2010
  • Author: Erik Eckel

The certification landscape changes as rapidly as the technologies you support. Here’s an updated list of certs that currently offer the most value and validity for IT pros.


Just as with many popular arguments — Red Sox v. Yankees, Chelsea v. Manchester United, Ford v. Chevy — IT certifications are popular fodder for debate. Except that certifications, in an IT professional’s microcosm of a world, have a bigger impact on the future. Just which certifications hold the most value today? Here’s my list of the 10 accreditations with the greatest potential for technology support professionals, administrators, and managers seeking employment within consulting firms or small and midsize organizations.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: MCITP

This best certification list could be built using 10 Microsoft certifications, many of which would be MCITP accreditations. The world runs on Microsoft. Those professionals earning Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP) certification give employers and clients confidence that they’ve developed the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, deploy, support, maintain, and optimize Windows technologies. Specifically, the Enterprise Desktop Administrator 7 and Server Administrator tracks hold great appeal, as will Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010, as older Exchange servers are retired in favor of the newer platform.

2: MCTS

With operating systems (Windows 2000, 2003, 2008, etc.) cycling through every several years, many IT professionals simply aren’t going to invest the effort to earn MCITP or MCSE accreditation on every version. That’s understandable. But mastering a single exam, especially when available examinations help IT pros demonstrate expertise with such popular platforms as Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, and Microsoft SQL Server 2008, is more than reasonable. That’s why the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) accreditation earns a spot on the list; it provides the opportunity for IT pros to demonstrate expertise on a specific technology that an organization may require right here, right now.

3: Network+

There’s simply no denying that IT professionals must know and understand the network principles and concepts that power everything within an organization’s IT infrastructure, whether running Windows, Linux, Apple, or other technologies. Instead of dismissing CompTIA’s Network+ as a baseline accreditation, every IT professional should add it to their resume.

4: A+

Just as with CompTIA’s Network+ certification, the A+ accreditation is another cert that all IT professionals should have on their resume. Proving baseline knowledge and expertise with the hardware components that power today’s computers should be required of all technicians. I’m amazed at the number of smart, intelligent, and seasoned IT pros who aren’t sure how to crack the case of a Sony Vaio or diagnose failed capacitors with a simple glance. The more industry staff can learn about the fundamental hardware components, the better.

5: CSSA

SonicWALLs power countless SMB VPNs. The company’s network devices also provide firewall and routing services, while extending gateway and perimeter security protections to organizations of all sizes. By gaining Certified SonicWALL Security Administrator (CSSA) certification, engineers can demonstrate their mastery of network security essentials, secure remote access, or secure wireless administration. There’s an immediate need for engineers with the knowledge and expertise required to configure and troubleshoot SonicWALL devices providing security services.

For the rest of the list, visit TechRepublic.com

Bulletin: Intel to buy McAfee for $7.68 billion

Chip maker says deal intended to beef up its mobile strategy

By Marc Ferranti – August 19, 2010 09:45 AM ET

IDG News Service – Intel said Thursday it plans to acquire security vendor McAfee in a cash deal valued at about $7.68 billion and aimed at enhancing the chip maker’s mobile strategy.

Both boards of directors have approved the deal, and McAfee is expected to become a subsidiary within Intel’s Software and Services Group.

“Hardware-enhanced security will lead to breakthroughs in effectively countering the increasingly sophisticated threats of today and tomorrow,” said Renée James, Intel senior vice president, and general manager of the group.

For more, visit Computerworld.com

Critical Adobe Reader hole to be patched Thursday

Elinor Mills CNET News | August 19, 2010 4:52 AM PDT

Adobe will release a patch on Thursday for a critical hole in Reader that was disclosed at the Black Hat conference late last month, the company said on Wednesday.

Adobe had announced on August 5 that the emergency fix was coming this week, in advance of the next quarterly security release, scheduled for October 12.

The security update will resolve an undisclosed number of critical issues in Reader 9.3.3 for Windows, Mac, and Unix; Acrobat 9.3.3 for Windows and Mac; and Reader 8.2.3 and Acrobat 8.2.3 for Windows and Mac, according to Adobe’s advisory.

The flaw, which could be exploited to take control of a computer, is related to the way Adobe’s PDF (portable document format) reader software handles fonts, said Charlie Miller, principal analyst at Independent Security Evaluators who disclosed the hole at the security conference.

Visit cnet.news for the rest of this story.

Deep theater defense

We all know perimeter firewalls are necessary but not sufficient. But what’s the right strategy for building additional layers of security? Greg Machler dives in.

By Greg Machler

August 17, 2010 — CSO

As an executive, do you ever get worried wondering if your corporate brand is properly protected from a lack of technological integrity? Corporations today have sensitive HR data, financial data, and often consumer data. If this data is compromised, often the outside world finds out about it, lawsuits are initiated and the corporate brand is tarnished. This could lead to consumers thinking twice about purchasing your products or services.

In the case of retail organizations, how does one effectively protect customer credit card data? Consider deploying an IT architecture that information security professionals call a deep-theater defense. Let’s investigate the design of this protective architecture:

First, put sensitive data in a second-tier of firewall segments behind the main corporate firewalls. This second-tier firewall and corresponding network shields sensitive applications and their data from being easily accessed if the Web-facing firewalls are breached.

For example, many national retailers sell groceries and have a pharmacy. It would be wise to deploy at least five firewall/network segments: one for HR data, one for financial data, one for credit card PCI (Payment Card Industry) data, one for pharmacy (HIPAA) data, and one for services that the other segments shared.

The segment containing services that are shared could contain common support services such as network and systems management, encryption and PKI functions, access control services, and security event management functions. Another architectural implementation that protects corporations from internal data theft is the creation of a tunneling access protocol. Often, critical systems are accessed by administrators and outside vendors.

It is important that all access to these applications be logged so that if an internal data breach occurs, the source can be discovered. It is important that the second-tier firewall close its administrative port access so that administration can only be initiated from the segment for common services. One wants to prevent access from administrative tools that exist in front of the second-tier firewalls.

Applications need to be ported behind the deep theater second-tier firewalls. Where does one start?

For the rest, visit CSO Online.