How to Build a Private Cloud

If you’re nervous about running your business applications on a public cloud, many experts recommend that you take a spin around a private cloud first.

By Beth Schultz on Mon, May 10, 2010

The Case For and Against Private Clouds

But building and managing a cloud within your data center is not just another infrastructure project, says Joe Tobolski, director of cloud computing at Accenture.

“A number of technology companies are portraying this as something you can go out and buy – sprinkle a little cloud-ulator powder on your data center and you have an internal cloud,” he says. “That couldn’t be further from the truth.”

An internal, on-premise private cloud is what leading IT organizations have been working toward for years. It begins with data center consolidation, rationalization of OS, hardware and software platforms, and virtualization up and down the stack – servers, storage and network, Tobolski says.

Elasticity and pay-as-you-go pricing are guiding principles, which imply standardization, automation and commoditization of IT, he adds.

And it goes way beyond about infrastructure and provisioning resources, Tobolski adds. “It’s about the application build and the user’s experience with IT, too.”

Despite all the hype, we’re at a very early stage when it comes to internal clouds. According to Forrester Research, only 5% of large enterprises globally are even capable of running an internal cloud, with maybe half of those actually having one, says James Staten, principal analyst with the firm.

For the rest of the article, visit CIO Magazine

Facebook identifies hacker selling 1.5 million accounts

17 May 2010

Reports are coming in that Facebook has identified the self-proclaimed hacker who was offering to sell batches of 1000 Facebook accounts – up to 1.5 million in total – and it appears that the Russian hacker was wildly overstating the account numbers.

Weekend newswire reports say that the hacker, who is known as Kirllos, had succeeded in hacking into a number of Facebook accounts, which he planned to sell via online hacker forums.

However Facebook has told reporters that the Russian hacker was significantly overstating his account haul.

Robert McMillan of the IDG newswire quoted a Facebook spokersperson as saying: “We have determined Kirllos’ identity through IP addresses, online accounts, and other information and believe that he’s very likely a low-level actor.”

McMillan says that Kirllos had been selling batches of 1000 accounts at between $25 and $45 a batch.\

For more, visit InfoSecurity-US.com